Stone Voices

In the deepest, darkest, mostly unseen recesses of global stone supply chains, some of the world’s poorest people are striving, with help from local NGOs, to educate their kids and improve their lives. So far, we in the West aren’t doing enough to help them.

Podcast: Reconnecting in a Hypernormal world

In a new BBC documentary [Hypernormalisation], Adam Curtis looks back to the 1970s to chart a course to today, where nothing seems certain and our political leaders strive above all else for stability in a world they no longer control.

Where might we go? What’s next? My fellow Earthworm Founder Julien Troussier watched Curtis’ documentary recently and we spoke about it over lunch.

Loving Dragons: Golden Agri Resources Gets it Right

Years and years of fighting dragons hasn’t yet stopped deforestation or many other ills. We’ve successfully ‘dragonised’ a lot of people, many companies and brands and yet here we are in Pooville. Judging people in this way leads to shame. Shame gets people’s attention and can work to raise awareness, get discussion started, but it leads to a very human call for punishment. When it comes to really changing, that has serious limits.

Searching for that “something else”? It starts with beauty

If we can see the beauty in the smallest of snails, the invisible bacteria and protozoans that surround us, just the thought of a wilderness we will never see, in the sunrise or sunset, in the furrowed brow of an exhausted soul torn by war, by poverty or even greed, might we not act in a way that better protects them? That loves them? If we can pause a moment and strive to appreciate the beauty in everything around us, surely we will approach our relationship with it, with ourselves and with each other in a completely different way?

Is purchasing eco-labelled products a concrete, accessible entry point for the average Joe?

I just can’t bring myself to advocate that consumers search for ecolabels. That just reinforces the status quo, business as usual approach that in my view urgently needs to change. The trouble I have with ecolabels is that some of them are OK, especially when done well. But they can also be highly misleading, promoting for example the idea of sustainability when workers are so disgustingly exploited.